Posts Tagged ‘tools

28
Aug
14

Interactive menus for UnitC++

UnitC++ has gone to version 1.1.0. The new feature is the addition of an interactive menu system. You run your tests declared using the TEST macro with the following code.

/=============================================================================
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  return UnitCpp::TestRegister::test_register().run_tests_interactive(
    argc,
    argv
  );
}

This will produce a menu which looks something like this;

================================================================================
0) All tests.

================================================================================
1) Maths
  2) "Maths:sqrt_results"
  3) "Maths:is_square"
  4) "Maths:sqrt_precondition"

================================================================================
5) MyString
  6) "MyString:length_test"
  7) "MyString:validity_test"

The numbers which you run the tests with can be input on the command line also, so utest.exe 0 will always run all of the tests.

See more at my sourceforge page

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29
Jul
14

UnitC++

This post is an introduction to a library I have written, UnitC++.

UnitC++ is a modern, light weight, header-only c++ library for making unit testing easy. The intention of this library is to make it really easy to test c++ code in a portable way.

 

Continue reading ‘UnitC++’

27
Nov
13

Using ediff with Version Control

This is just a quick note about a nice emacs feature.

If you develop with emacs, you may have heard of/used ediff. This is a very handy diff program which runs inside emacs. We use this with a custom hook at work to work with our version control system. I found out that it works nicely with more standard version control systems as well.

The main way to use ediff is the command

  ediff-buffers

This lets you choose two buffers to diff. To do this for different revisions of a file you can use the command

  ediff-revision

This will ask for which file you want to view revisions of (default, the current buffer), and the two revisions to compare (default latest revision and the current state). The you will have the file you asked for loaded in the two revisions you asked for.

Using mercurial personally I find this more informative than the output from hg diff in complicated cases. I believe this works for any version control system recognised by emacs, e.g. mercurial git and subversion.